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lastfirstkiss:


sameraism:
horrormoans:

roserayne:

itsinthetrees:

corbyjane:

waltdisneyconfessions:

“I’ve always lived in predominantly Caucasian places and, growing up with the three Disney classics, I would ask my parents why I didn’t look like my friends—why I couldn’t be a princess. When Mulan came out, I was struck with awe that someone like me could be the heroine of a story. So, to those saying that Disney shouldn’t have to worry about diversifying their protagonists, I have to argue that they still should. Everyone should be able to look in the mirror and see someone worthwhile”

I think it’s really sad that kids are growing up with so little imagination that they require a physical carbon copy of themselves before they can identify with a character. I “look” like Belle, but I never identified with a princess—EVER—until Tangled came out, and it was lifechanging to watch someone who felt sheltered and who just wanted to break free and experience more, but was scared because the person she trusted told her it was too dangerous…just like me!!! 
I don’t think there’s anything wrong with diversifying, but I think that if you as a child can’t see past physical appearances to the person underneath, there might be something wrong with you. 

i think it’s really sad that you exist

I probably shouldn’t reply to this in the current mood I’m in so I’m just gonna link you to this which says everything far better than I can ever hope for. 

How do people manage to miss the point time-and-time again. How do people manage to make everything about themselves and think so small? Really people, how? I guess if you identify with being sheltered and naive, that’s how, but the point went directly over your head. Belle is white, Rapunzel is white. Mulan is not white, the creator of that confession is not white either. Ignoring personality traits, she didn’t have anyone to identify with physically while you had Snow White, Belle, Ariel, Cinderella, Aurora and whatever other white princess has slid out of Disney. This isn’t about a lack of imagination, it’s about a lack of characters children can look at and say “hey! they look like me!” and feel as if they matter. The implications Disney has thrown out with having mostly white Princess more or less tells children, one way or another, that they don’t matter and they frankly don’t exist at large. It’s easy for you to tell someone to look underneath something when you can identify with the surface time and time again. 

This was my confession. And, thank you for your concern, corbyjane, but I would like to reassure you that there is nothing wrong with me. However, I would like to ask that you check your white privilege. I’m not sure if you realize, but all I really saw of Asians in the media prior to Mulan was the Siamese cats from The Lady and the Tramp—clearly not the most flattering image of the Asian race. Even a great imagination can suffer under the bombardment of the message that the only people the media deems worth the title of protagonist or princess are skinny, heterosexual, Caucasian girls.
Also, I still don’t have a “physical carbon copy of [myself],” and nor do I need one. Technically, as a Filipino, I look more like a cross between Mulan and Pocahontas. It was nice, though, to be able to relate to someone I could consider a role model. And I mean that in terms of culture, as well. Of course, personality is extremely important. But, perhaps equally as significant to young girls who stray from the skinny, heterosexual, Caucasian norm, is seeing that their differences are not flaws.

What a classy response to a crass reblog of a confession. 
I’m Filipina as well, and I used to sit and cry in the bathroom with teen girl magazines when I was 12/13. I would keep thinking these girls are all so pretty and I’ll never look like them and it was because NO ONE looked like me. Ever.
It’s not just about what they look like. When Mulan sang, look at me, I will never pass for a perfect bride, or a perfect daughter I started crying because I related to it on multiple levels. Not only because she was a girl who looked like me, but because on another level, she was singing about something within my culture. The constant need to be perfect for our parents, please our parents, to prove daughters are worthy as well. I won’t deny that there are parts of the movie that are problematic, but that part really touched me. 
I’ll end this by echoing the confession creator: there is nothing wrong with me.



You are perfect.

lastfirstkiss:

sameraism:

horrormoans:

roserayne:

itsinthetrees:

corbyjane:

waltdisneyconfessions:

“I’ve always lived in predominantly Caucasian places and, growing up with the three Disney classics, I would ask my parents why I didn’t look like my friends—why I couldn’t be a princess. When Mulan came out, I was struck with awe that someone like me could be the heroine of a story. So, to those saying that Disney shouldn’t have to worry about diversifying their protagonists, I have to argue that they still should. Everyone should be able to look in the mirror and see someone worthwhile”

I think it’s really sad that kids are growing up with so little imagination that they require a physical carbon copy of themselves before they can identify with a character. I “look” like Belle, but I never identified with a princess—EVER—until Tangled came out, and it was lifechanging to watch someone who felt sheltered and who just wanted to break free and experience more, but was scared because the person she trusted told her it was too dangerous…just like me!!! 

I don’t think there’s anything wrong with diversifying, but I think that if you as a child can’t see past physical appearances to the person underneath, there might be something wrong with you

i think it’s really sad that you exist

I probably shouldn’t reply to this in the current mood I’m in so I’m just gonna link you to this which says everything far better than I can ever hope for. 

How do people manage to miss the point time-and-time again. How do people manage to make everything about themselves and think so small? Really people, how? I guess if you identify with being sheltered and naive, that’s how, but the point went directly over your head. 

Belle is white, Rapunzel is white. Mulan is not white, the creator of that confession is not white either. Ignoring personality traits, she didn’t have anyone to identify with physically while you had Snow White, Belle, Ariel, Cinderella, Aurora and whatever other white princess has slid out of Disney. This isn’t about a lack of imagination, it’s about a lack of characters children can look at and say “hey! they look like me!” and feel as if they matter. The implications Disney has thrown out with having mostly white Princess more or less tells children, one way or another, that they don’t matter and they frankly don’t exist at large. 

It’s easy for you to tell someone to look underneath something when you can identify with the surface time and time again. 

This was my confession. And, thank you for your concern, corbyjane, but I would like to reassure you that there is nothing wrong with me. However, I would like to ask that you check your white privilege. I’m not sure if you realize, but all I really saw of Asians in the media prior to Mulan was the Siamese cats from The Lady and the Tramp—clearly not the most flattering image of the Asian race. Even a great imagination can suffer under the bombardment of the message that the only people the media deems worth the title of protagonist or princess are skinny, heterosexual, Caucasian girls.

Also, I still don’t have a “physical carbon copy of [myself],” and nor do I need one. Technically, as a Filipino, I look more like a cross between Mulan and Pocahontas. It was nice, though, to be able to relate to someone I could consider a role model. And I mean that in terms of culture, as well. Of course, personality is extremely important. But, perhaps equally as significant to young girls who stray from the skinny, heterosexual, Caucasian norm, is seeing that their differences are not flaws.

What a classy response to a crass reblog of a confession. 

I’m Filipina as well, and I used to sit and cry in the bathroom with teen girl magazines when I was 12/13. I would keep thinking these girls are all so pretty and I’ll never look like them and it was because NO ONE looked like me. Ever.

It’s not just about what they look like. When Mulan sang, look at me, I will never pass for a perfect bride, or a perfect daughter I started crying because I related to it on multiple levels. Not only because she was a girl who looked like me, but because on another level, she was singing about something within my culture. The constant need to be perfect for our parents, please our parents, to prove daughters are worthy as well. I won’t deny that there are parts of the movie that are problematic, but that part really touched me. 

I’ll end this by echoing the confession creator: there is nothing wrong with me.

You are perfect.
 
  1. lifesdiversities reblogged this from waltdisneyconfessions and added:
    the people that say “frozen” isn’t doing anything wrong are obv white and privileged to have a lot of disney characters...
  2. missvgc reblogged this from waltdisneyconfessions
  3. ohleahdarling reblogged this from glass-onion-
  4. puckling reblogged this from vividly-v
  5. vividly-v reblogged this from gqgqqt
  6. justsothoughts reblogged this from feministdisney
  7. pbnpineapples reblogged this from feministdisney
  8. torigold reblogged this from actualqueencersei
  9. columbinax reblogged this from waltdisneyconfessions
  10. belliebuttons reblogged this from feministdisney
  11. samsib reblogged this from feministdisney
  12. awgskarth reblogged this from waltdisneyconfessions
  13. tsumugu-sama reblogged this from waltdisneyconfessions
  14. poliinom reblogged this from noluvallowed
  15. neuroticdragon reblogged this from feministdisney
  16. auxein reblogged this from noluvallowed
  17. noluvallowed reblogged this from ohsnapsitsjessie and added:
    LIKE PRINCESS TIANA??
  18. ohsnapsitsjessie reblogged this from sparksandfires
  19. sparksandfires reblogged this from feministdisney and added:
    Now if only they’d get a brown Princess…
  20. ofcourseilovegale reblogged this from waltdisneyconfessions and added:
  21. officialsmokescreen reblogged this from klingonrealitytelevision
  22. klingonrealitytelevision reblogged this from waltdisneyconfessions
  23. waltpottergamesxxx reblogged this from waltdisneyconfessions and added:
    Awww :’) ♥
  24. renamok reblogged this from waltdisneyconfessions and added:
    I don’t know how I missed this beautiful confession the first time ‘round, but I’m glad I found it now. ♥ More people...
  25. heyydm reblogged this from goongprincess
  26. goongprincess reblogged this from waltdisneyconfessions